Those colleges and universities that strive to not only welcome a diverse population, but create a campus environment that reflects and nourishes that community, can be difficult to find through word searches and hopeful clicks alone. Which is why we’ve done all that work for you. In this guide you’ll find absolutely everything you need to know about applying to and succeeding in college as a LGBT identified person. We have the definitive list on the friendliest LGBT schools, which scholarships you should apply for, a trans chapter, and many more resources for you.


Florida is well known for its coastal lifestyle, sunny skies, vacation destinations and ties to the space program. It’s no wonder more than 113 million people visit Florida each year and 20+ million people make it their home. What people may not know about Florida is that it was named a Best State for Higher Education by U.S. News & World Report. Top quality academics, year-round good weather and some of the lowest tuition rates in the country are just a few of the reasons Florida is a great option for college.

The cost of going to college involves a wide variety of factors from tuition, books and housing to travel, equipment, clothing, food and more. Many individuals are entering college well after high school and may have job and family-related expenses to consider. Additionally, the College Board cites in the 2016 Trends in College Pricing report that students are taking longer to graduate, which results in higher education costs due to delays in obtaining the rewards of post-college earnings.
The state also boasts a growing employment market, with a number of Florida cities named in the Top 100 Best Places for Jobs (WalletHub2017). The New York Times cited Tampa as the fourth fastest-growing job market in the nation, while Florida Trend reported that Kiplinger ranked the sunshine state third among “States with the Fastest Job Growth.” Florida’s 23-county High Tech Corridor promotes high tech growth in key industries such as agritechnology, aviation and aerospace, information technology, medical technology and sustainable energy, among others.
Figuring out what college to attend can be a bit like taking a drink from a fire hose, so we’ve assembled a comprehensive guide to selecting the top colleges that are right for you. Using this College Choice Rankings Guide will help you quickly understand the basics of getting into college or university, what to expect once you’re there, some of the ins and outs of good colleges, and the usefulness of college rankings systems in helping you make an informed decision.
Florida’s economic indicators bode well for students graduating from college now and into the future. Looking at Florida’s job growth rate compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that it is outpacing the national average. Florida job growth for college graduates is even better. Florida Institute of Technology has even been ranked among the best in the United States for graduate employability by Times Higher Education in the U.S. University Employability Survey.
Duke's stunning campus in Durham, North Carolina, features impressive Gothic revival architecture in the campus center, and extensive modern research facilities spreading out from the main campus. With an acceptance rate in the teens, it is also the most selective university in the South. Duke, along with nearby UNC Chapel Hill and NC State, make up the "research triangle," an area purported to have the highest concentration of PhDs and MDs in the world.
 What benefits students most is to consider their niche in order to find a college environment that best suits their goals and personality, from the size of the school, flexibility of the curriculum, culture of the neighboring community, type of specialized programs, number of research and intern opportunities, options for graduate school, and access to alumni. Private schools often offer smaller class sizes, professor-led mentorship, customizable curriculum, merit aid and other benefits. All these factors combine to give students a wide range of options from some of the best academic programs in Florida.
In the U.S. News & World Report and other national rankings, Princeton University frequently vies with Harvard for the top spot. The schools, however, are very different. Princeton's attractive 500-acre campus is located in a town of about 30,000 people, and the urban centers of Philadelphia and New York City are each about an hour away. With just over 5,000 undergrads and about 2,600 grad students, Princeton has a much more intimate educational environment than many of the other top universities.
Freshman: As a freshman at Tufts, I am constantly blown alway by endless opportunities available to undergraduate students at various academic departments, student-run organizations, and Tisch College of Civic Engagement. Students are here to learn from a wide range of perspectives and always listen carefully to one another to reexamine their thoughts. Even in today's political divisiveness, I find Tufts students relatively open-minded and tolerant to perspectives and thoughts that might be contrary to their own. Furthermore, as a student who plans on majoring in International Relations, I am always struck by how organized the program is here at Tufts. Professors and students are experts in their field, and I can easily see future diplomats and leading scholars in my classroom. There are conferences at the Fletcher school almost every week where leading scholars and researchers come and speak. I love Tufts!
In Florida, there are 72 public and private colleges and universities. Compared to other states across the nation, Florida is a top pick when considering its warm weather, southern charm and year-round activities. Along with the attractive climate, Florida schools make the mark for their value when considering expenses for tuition and cost of living. A recent CNBC report noted Florida second in a list of the ten most affordable states for a public college education, and the College Board Trends in College Pricing report shows public and private tuition and room and board costs to be lowest in the South.
Captain Williams has accrued an impressive amount of spacewalk time: she spent 50 hours and 40 minutes outside of the International Space Station (ISS); and in completing two missions to the ISS, she has spent over eleven total months orbiting Earth. Back on the ground, Captain Williams has continued her career in the space industry as a member of NASA’s Commercial Crew Transportation Capability, a group of veteran astronauts who work with privately-held companies to develop spacecraft. Her contributions have helped to build the Boeing CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX Dragon. She is among four veteran astronauts chosen by NASA to fly the first commercial space vehicles.
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