Jonathan Zung, PhD, knows what it takes to grow professionally. He began his career as an analytical chemist with Pfizer in 1991 and over the last twenty-five years has held a variety of executive leadership positions in the pharmaceutical and pharmaceutical services industries. Each of his roles has exposed Jonathan to new challenges and allowed him to operate outside his comfort zone. Jonathan currently serves as advisor to the CEO of WCG clinical and president of one of their operating divisions. Prior to that he served as group president for clinical development and commercialization services for Covance Drug Development, a LabCorp company. In that role he led a global organization of over 8,000 employees in sixty countries spanning all phases of clinical development and market access services.
Alum: I loved the campus and the teachers, especially my professors. I really got a chance to connect with them while on campus! I loved their teaching methods; they really let us explore the topics we covered, by ourselves, and with our own interest. They gave us constructive criticism and we gladly grew and flourished in that environment. I would like to change one though, and that is the parking on campus. Harvard has a major parking problem, and that should really be taken a look at.
Niche User: Our tour guide was well trained. He waited for someone to leave the dorms to have them tell the group what the best thing was about Amherst. The Dean was very intelligent and knowledgeable and gave a great information session presentation to the group. It is a small liberal arts college which is academically based and hard to get into. A mini Harvard that was scaled down. A shuttle transports you to the other 5 colleges connected with Amherst (University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Smith College, Mount-Holyoke College and Hampshire College). If accepted into any one of these colleges, you can attend classes, sports, activities at any of these colleges if they offer something that you are interested in. A nice feature to have offered because all of a sudden there is a larger area of interest, sports and activities to choose from. Making it almost impossible not to have something that you are looking for or interested in which can happen at small schools with limited choices.
Cornell has the largest undergraduate population of all the Ivies, and the university has strengths in a broad range of disciplines. You need to be willing to tolerate some cold winter days if you attend Cornell, but the location in Ithaca, New York, is beautiful. The hillside campus overlooks Lake Cayuga, and you'll find stunning gorges cutting through the campus. The university also has the most complex administrative structure among the top universities since some of its programs are housed within a state-funded statutory unit.
Niche User: I got accepted for Astronomy/Astrophysics at the Daytona Beach Campus. I’m thrilled about this. I was emailing the Senior Assistant Director of Admissions Megan Spurrel, and I 90% do not recommend contacting her with questions and you’re better off emailing someone else on the admissions team. I was asking about the Worldwide program and wondering if I would be able to transfer to it if my major was offered by the program and whatnot (it’s not.) Never did I say I definitely wanted to transfer, and I never asked her to cancel my application but she took it upon herself to do so (I emailed her back before she did, thankfully.) I find it ridiculous that she would assume that was okay when I was ONLY INQUIRING. I’ve read through the emails, there is no way she should’ve gotten confused and believed it was alright to cancel my application. Besides her, I’ve heard nothing but good things about the institution. I hope that everything works out so I can attend!
Let’s face it, there are many reasons to live in Florida and to go to college in Florida. Being near the beach, year-round warm weather and access to numerous outdoor activities are the perfect complement to classes, friends and nightlife. Florida’s climate is warm, subtropical and has an average yearround temperature of 82°F. Aside from classes and studying, student life may include sports or participation in Greek or service clubs. There’s so much more to a Florida life than what’s on campus.
In Florida, there are 72 public and private colleges and universities. Compared to other states across the nation, Florida is a top pick when considering its warm weather, southern charm and year-round activities. Along with the attractive climate, Florida schools make the mark for their value when considering expenses for tuition and cost of living. A recent CNBC report noted Florida second in a list of the ten most affordable states for a public college education, and the College Board Trends in College Pricing report shows public and private tuition and room and board costs to be lowest in the South.
Sophomore: University of Miami is one of the most beautiful schools structurally as well as exceptionally academic. From its quaint fountain lake to its modern building architecture, UM's landscape is a playground. Ducks, lizards and all types of animals freely live in harmony with the amused students, creating an adventurous atmosphere. Professors are compassionate to individual student concerns, and are always there to aid in understanding the material or to listen with a genuine manner. The students are always grateful, seen walking around campus with a natural bliss created by the mixture of warm weather and visually pleasing stimuli. There are events everyday, either frat promotions, club activities, or donation collections. Donate a dollar and throw a pie in a participant's face! There is always something extracurricular to do on campus such as free concerts; Zedd performed this last year! Although UM is a lot of fun, the library is a special place for commitment to studying.
Freshman: Prepare to work hard - especially if you're in STEM. As an engineering major my life here is a never ending cycle of attending classes, working in lab, engineering project team related work, doing homework and crashing/going to bed at 1-2AM. It may seem rough to the outsider but if you're coming from a challenging high school (as I did) its a relatively seamless transition and I am infinitely happier here at Cornell! There is constantly something new happening from the range of amazing speakers visiting, cool things your classmates are creating/doing, Ithaca's quirky charm, your eccentric professors , etc... I came here expecting the competition to be intense and thank goodness its not ; there's a sense of general comradery amongst engineers. The motto 'any person, any study' is really true. They have just about every major allowing allotting the opportunity to study a great variety of fields. Fair warning about Ithaca; it gets REALLY cold! Invest in a warm coat!
Freshman: As a freshman at Tufts, I am constantly blown alway by endless opportunities available to undergraduate students at various academic departments, student-run organizations, and Tisch College of Civic Engagement. Students are here to learn from a wide range of perspectives and always listen carefully to one another to reexamine their thoughts. Even in today's political divisiveness, I find Tufts students relatively open-minded and tolerant to perspectives and thoughts that might be contrary to their own. Furthermore, as a student who plans on majoring in International Relations, I am always struck by how organized the program is here at Tufts. Professors and students are experts in their field, and I can easily see future diplomats and leading scholars in my classroom. There are conferences at the Fletcher school almost every week where leading scholars and researchers come and speak. I love Tufts!
Today’s graduates, more than ever before, also venture out on their own to create a career. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports more than 15.5 million people (10% of the workforce) are self-employed across a variety of occupations, with Florida’s self-employment rate equal to the national average. Add to this a continued trend in remote employment and the job opportunities expand even more.
Niche User: Our tour guide was well trained. He waited for someone to leave the dorms to have them tell the group what the best thing was about Amherst. The Dean was very intelligent and knowledgeable and gave a great information session presentation to the group. It is a small liberal arts college which is academically based and hard to get into. A mini Harvard that was scaled down. A shuttle transports you to the other 5 colleges connected with Amherst (University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Smith College, Mount-Holyoke College and Hampshire College). If accepted into any one of these colleges, you can attend classes, sports, activities at any of these colleges if they offer something that you are interested in. A nice feature to have offered because all of a sudden there is a larger area of interest, sports and activities to choose from. Making it almost impossible not to have something that you are looking for or interested in which can happen at small schools with limited choices.

Freshman: As a freshman at Tufts, I am constantly blown alway by endless opportunities available to undergraduate students at various academic departments, student-run organizations, and Tisch College of Civic Engagement. Students are here to learn from a wide range of perspectives and always listen carefully to one another to reexamine their thoughts. Even in today's political divisiveness, I find Tufts students relatively open-minded and tolerant to perspectives and thoughts that might be contrary to their own. Furthermore, as a student who plans on majoring in International Relations, I am always struck by how organized the program is here at Tufts. Professors and students are experts in their field, and I can easily see future diplomats and leading scholars in my classroom. There are conferences at the Fletcher school almost every week where leading scholars and researchers come and speak. I love Tufts!

Jonathan Zung, PhD, knows what it takes to grow professionally. He began his career as an analytical chemist with Pfizer in 1991 and over the last twenty-five years has held a variety of executive leadership positions in the pharmaceutical and pharmaceutical services industries. Each of his roles has exposed Jonathan to new challenges and allowed him to operate outside his comfort zone. Jonathan currently serves as advisor to the CEO of WCG clinical and president of one of their operating divisions. Prior to that he served as group president for clinical development and commercialization services for Covance Drug Development, a LabCorp company. In that role he led a global organization of over 8,000 employees in sixty countries spanning all phases of clinical development and market access services.
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